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​Chinese calligraphy

Updated: Aug 02, 2018 Print

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The Tang Dynasty copy of calligraphy by Wang Xizhi [Photo/IC]

Chinese calligraphy is not only a tool for communication, but also an artistic expression of the Chinese language in a tangible form.

Evolving from oracles, stone drum inscriptions and bronze inscriptions to large seal scripts, small seal scripts and clerical scripts, Chinese calligraphy eventually fell into three main categories: cursive writing, running script and regular style.

As a unique visual art, Chinese calligraphy constitutes a form of aesthetically pleasing writing. You may come across it on any surface suitable for writing, such as letter paper, scrolls, fan coverings and even the walls of cliffs.

In its distinctive Chinese form, calligraphy is a significant way to appreciate traditional Chinese culture. It is a treasure cherished by the Chinese people and embodies important aspects of China's intellectual heritage.

Currently, Chinese calligraphy is taught at school in addition to traditional master-apprentice instruction. It is usually a part of the regular primary and middle school curriculum and is offered in specialized programs at the higher education levels.


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